May 14, 2013

A Day in Normandy - Soaking Up Some History

Abbaye aux Hommes

Seems like since moving to Normandy, we're more popular than ever.
In the last year we've had more friends come to visit than in the final few years we spent in the Languedoc. Is it the cows and apple trees? The sea? The proximity to Paris?

My bet is on our proximity to Paris. Being hidden away in the middle of vineyards in rural Languedoc is akin to living on Mars for some people.

Seminary in Sommervieu

Église Saint Pierre

Last week a friend from the Languedoc drove up to stay with us for a few days before heading to Brittany. This wasn't just any friend though...Laurent is an architect for the Bâtiments de France and is totally passionate about Romanesque and Gothic architecture. It was like having a history professor staying with us.

In one day I soaked up more culture and learned more French architecture terms than I ever thought possible. I also gained an entirely new perspective of the history of Normandy. It was an amazing experience and we felt incredibly spoiled to have our very own guide sharing his wealth of knowledge with us.

Fresco

l'Abbaye de Cerisy-la-Forêt

Stairwell

St Nicolas Church

Priory of Saint-Gabriel

Abbaye aux Hommes. #Caen

Abbaye aux Hommes

Le Château de Creully

Priory of Saint-Gabriel



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14 comments:

Michel said...

I know I would like to have a person come visit us that was an expert about the history of buildings in France. It would be great fun as you know to soak up all of that information. Great pictures with your post.

Melinda Larson-Horne said...

I love Normandy! The green pastures and apple orchards make "une petite wisconsinaise" feel at home while the history and architecture make my francophile heart sing (surtout les plages et le Mont-Saint-Michel). Merci pour ces belles photos!

Nadege said...

Having someone's knowledge and enthusiasm about a subject makes a huge difference. You are lucky to have such a friend. You have a good life; enjoy it to the fullest!

Karen (Back Road Journal) said...

I'm happy to have discovered your blog. My husband and I travel to France often and Normandy is such a lovely area. I enjoyed your photos.

Emm said...

What wonderful pictures. And how fortunate to have an expert guide. Are those all in and around Bayeux, or farther afield?

Marie Angelique said...

This is such a lovely post and what wonderful photos! I just found your blog today and it is like going back to France. Love it!

Jennifer Greco said...

Michel
It was such a wonderful few days and he plans on coming back again soon. I can't wait!

Melinda
I'm glad they made you feel at home. I spent many years in Seattle, so feel right at home in Normandy too.

Jennifer Greco said...

Nadege
We are very lucky and we appreciate that fact every day.

Karen
Thank you for stopping by and commenting! Your photos of forsythia and apple blossoms look like our garden! :)

Jennifer Greco said...

Emm
They are all within a 30-40 minute drive of Bayeux. I feel like I've barely scratched the surface of the rich history of this region!

Marie Angelique
I am so happy that you stopped by to comment. I've had a look at your blog and look forward to reading more! What is your dog's name? :)

La Torontoise said...

Love pink blossom, medieval buildings and church interior:-) it's so inspirational!

Anonymous said...

thank you for the wonderful photos , what camera?
or iPhone? ummm

.... you moved could it be this article ?
it is not the Montpellier I know ...!

http://bygonebureau.com/2012/04/25/the-rust-belt-of-france-montpellier/

Jennifer Greco said...

La Torontoise
Thank you! I was inspired too.

Anon
Glad you like the photos. :) I use a Panasonic Lumix an iPhone and a Pentax K-2.
Interesting article...but that's not why we moved.

Normandy Thenandnow said...

Lovely photos, isn't Normandy a strange mixture of caring passionately for it's history, then looking the other way as heritage crumbles.. An old postcard of a classically beautiful 17th century castle took us to Cahaignes. We could find nothing online about it, perhaps a private owner had sensibly protected their privacy? But when we found it the château is completely abandoned and derelict. Strangely beautiful though. See the château and what we did find out here: http://www.normandythenandnow.com/cahaignes/

Jennifer Greco said...

Normandy Then and Now
Thanks for sharing your photos of the château. Sadly there are many crumbling manor homes and châteaux, all over France.